The effects of bioadhesive hyaluronic acid gel versus diclofenac after surgical removal of impacted wisdom teeth.

  • Abdul Hammed N Department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery, College of Dentistry, Mosul University – Ninavah- Iraq.
  • Ziad H. Deleme Department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery, College of Dentistry, Mosul University – Ninavah- Iraq.

Abstract

Surgical extraction of impacted lower wisdom teeth is a frequent minor intraoral surgical process. It is regularly linked with aching and postoperative consequences as pain and swelling. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of two methods in reducing swelling and pain subsequent to the removal of impacted wisdom teeth. This randomized study incorporated 20 patients with impacted wisdom teeth of different surgical complexity. Topical hyaluronic acid gel 2g/2ml with aloe vera (Kin®Care) was given to the patients to be applied to the surgical area three times a day, or diclofenac sodium tablet 50mg (Voltaren®) to be taken every eight hours, for one week. Swelling was estimated using a strip gauge technique, and pain with a visual analogue scale. Evaluations were made on day one of surgical treatment and on 72hrs and one week later. Statistically no significant differences were identified regarding the swelling and pain values between the two treatment groups on the third and seventh day after surgery. Hyaluronic acid gel was as efficient as diclofenac tablets in reducing the two parameters. The use of hyaluronic acid may be advantageous in medically compromised patient such as those with hypertension, chronic asthma, gastric ulcers or in those with any contraindications to using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or in pregnant patients to reduce pain and swelling subsequent to impacted wisdom teeth surgery.

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Published
2019-08-09
How to Cite
N, Abdul Hammed; DELEME, Ziad H.. The effects of bioadhesive hyaluronic acid gel versus diclofenac after surgical removal of impacted wisdom teeth.. Journal of Oral Research, [S.l.], p. 28-31, aug. 2019. ISSN 0719-2479. Available at: <http://www.joralres.com/index.php/JOR/article/view/831>. Date accessed: 11 dec. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.17126/jor.v1i1.831.
Section
Communications