Evaluation of bracket failure in relation to different factors in patients experiencing comprehensive orthodontic treatment: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

  • Naif A. Bindayel Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics College of Dentistry, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Abdulrahman Alwadei Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics College of Dentistry, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Naif Almosa Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics College of Dentistry, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Wajdy Aasser Dept. of Oral Med and Diagnostic Science College of Dentistry, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Ahmad Qazali Dept. of Prosthodontics College of Dentistry, Taibah University, Saudi Arabia.
  • Abdulaziz Samran Dept. of Restorative and Prosthetic Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Dar al Uloom University Riyadh Saudi Arabia. Dept. of prosthodontics, Ibb University, Ibb Yemen.
  • Ali Alqerban Dept. of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Dept. of Preventive Dental Science, Faculty of dentistry, Dar al Uloom University Riyadh Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate loose brackets in relation to various related factors in orthodontic patients who had completed orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, 738 medical records of patients who had undergone comprehensive orthodontic treatment and matched specific inclusion criteria were selected. Paired t-tests and ANOVA, along with the Mann-Whitney test and Kruskal–Wallis analyses were performed to compare the means of variables between selected subgroups. Results: Loose brackets were found most frequently on premolars, followed by incisors and then canines (p<0.01). Male and young patients were found to have a higher incidence of loose brackets compared to female and adult patients (p=0.044 and p<0.01, respectively). The highest correlation coefficient value was found between treatment duration and total number of loose brackets (0.393), which was statistically significant. Conclusions: The frequency of total number of loose brackets increased with younger age group. Premolar teeth were found to be the most commonly affected teeth, followed by incisors and canines. Mandibular teeth presented more loose brackets than maxillary.

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Published
2019-04-26
How to Cite
BINDAYEL, Naif A. et al. Evaluation of bracket failure in relation to different factors in patients experiencing comprehensive orthodontic treatment: A Retrospective Cohort Study.. Journal of Oral Research, [S.l.], v. 8, n. 2, p. 116-121, apr. 2019. ISSN 0719-2479. Available at: <http://www.joralres.com/index.php/JOR/article/view/763>. Date accessed: 20 aug. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.17126/jor.v0i0.763.
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Articles